Cricket news - Cummins calls for 'another option' following saliva ban

Sweat's not bad, but I think we need something more than that, ideally. Whatever that is, wax or I don't know what - Cummins

Sweat's not bad, but I think we need something more than that, ideally. Whatever that is, wax or I don't know what - Cummins

Australia's leading fast bowler Pat Cummins has called for an alternative method to shine the ball following the ICC cricket committee's recommendation to ban the usage of saliva. The Anil Kumble-led committee came up with the suggestion considering the risk of transmission of the Coronavirus via saliva.

Although the usage of sweat is permissible to shine the ball, Cummins has called for the governing body to come up with an additional artificial option. Under the current ICC regulations, the usage of an artificial substance to shine or change the condition of the ball isn't allowed.

"If we remove saliva, we have to have another option," Cummins told Cricket.com.au. "Sweat's not bad, but I think we need something more than that, ideally. Whatever that is, wax or I don't know what. If that's what that science is telling us, that it's high risk using saliva ... as long as we're keeping other options open, whether that's sweat or something artificial."

While Cummins is glad sweat is deemed safe, he did point out that it could get difficult while playing in cold weather. "We have to be able to shine the ball somehow so I'm glad they've let sweat remain," he said. "We've just got to make sure at the start of the spell we're sweating and we're nice and warm. Late in the day in Australia, it'll be fine, but certainly on a cold day (it could be difficult).

"Your slip cordon is normally the ones shining the ball and they're not huge sweaters standing there all day. It'll be interesting, it'll be an adjustment. Hopefully we'll get to a stage where saliva is deemed safe. Hopefully we can go back to that, to how it was."

Under these testing times, the world number 1 Test bowler also recommended for pitches in Australia to provide more assistance to the seamers considering how batting-friendly they had become in recent years. "In the last few years, I feel like it's hardly swung at all," he noted. "Hopefully, like we always say, the wickets will be a bit juicier to suit us bowlers."